When I came out to my parents the first time, they were very upset. Whenever I brought up the subject or tried to assert my identity my dad would act mean towards me. Seven years later my mom started to accept me, secretly, but not in front of my dad. Nine years later when I came out to my dad for the third time — and after I had been on hormones for a year and a half — he finally accepted me as his daughter.

February 14th, 2012  
 
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When I came out, I asked my mother to tell my father for me, because I was scared. Two minutes later, he came into the room and gave me a hug, and told me that it didn’t matter if I was dating a girl. He was still proud to be my father.

February 14th, 2012  
 
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When I came out to my new college friends and roommates, they barely reacted–just stared at me. I thought they were freaked, didn’t know what to say. But when I mentioned that, months later, they said, “No–sweetie, it was *7am*. You could have told us you fellated goats, and we would have just yawned and said, ‘Oh. Pass the salt?'”

February 14th, 2012  
 
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When I came out my dad said, “At least we won’t have to pay for a wedding.” It was short-lived when my mom reminded him gay marrige is legal in Canada.

February 14th, 2012  
 
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When I came out as asexual, my dad grunted and walked away from me. That night, he stared me down while I ate. He wanted it to be clear: he wasn’t going to judge me for my sexuality the way he’d judge me for taking his last granola bar.

February 13th, 2012  
 
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When I came out, I was talking to my best friend on AIM and said, “I think I might, maybe…be gay”. She was amazingly supportive and late that night drove me around through the deserted streets of our town, rolled down my window, and made me scream “I’M GAY!” until I got comfortable saying it. More friends and family followed and were equally supportive and I feel so lucky to have such amazing people in my life.

February 13th, 2012  
 
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When I came out, I learned what family really meant, that sometimes it doesn’t have anything to do with your DNA. My parents withdrew their support, and my friends, professors, and trans mentors stepped up to provide support in a huge way. I was terrified, but I found my people and I found myself.

February 13th, 2012  
 
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When I came out, my family started telling me they loved me for the first time on a regular basis.

February 13th, 2012  
 
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When I came out to my grandmother as bisexual, she was immediately supportive, asking me if I was dating an out lesbian friend of mine (I wished!) and otherwise leaving it be. Years later, she called me crying about the end of a secret decades-long lesbian relationship with her best friend because she had no one else in the family to talk to. I’m happily married to a man today, but I’m still out because the chance to be supportive is never irrelevant.

February 13th, 2012  
 
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When I came out, my parents–especially my Dad–had a difficult time. My father had taken care of my cousin who was dying of AIDS in the late ’80s, and years later, I think this was still running through his head. He quickly grew to accept and support me and my boyfriend…now husband.

February 13th, 2012  
 
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